Art Buzz January 31, 2012: Bob Schiffauer: Black History Month Torchbearers Art exhibit peers into forgotten past

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART NEWS

Torchbearers

 

Art exhibit peers into forgotten past

Source: Texas A&M The Battalion, 1-31-12

 
Bob Schiffauer

David Godinez — THE BATTALION

Artist and architecture professor Bob Schiffauer adjusts pieces of his portrait series “Torchbearers” at the Wright Gallery.

 

A&M’s 2012 campus celebration of Black History Month begins with artistic tributes to the greats of African-American history.

 

Opening Wednesday, architecture professor Bob Schiffauer’s “Torchbearers” portrait series will be on display in the Langford Architecture Building’s Wright Gallery through Feb. 28. Among other influential icons, the gallery features Charles Gordone, the first African-American to receive the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. After retiring from acting and directing, Gordone came to A&M to serve as professor of English and theatre from 1987 to 1995.

 

A symbolic sculpture of Gordone stands prominently in the center of the exhibit. Also featured are drawings of a western play that Gordone and his wife, Susan, were creating before he died in 1995. Mrs. Gordone saved her husband’s writings and has worked with Schiffauer and his students to recreate the play through artwork.

 

“When somebody leaves behind this kind of a work, you don’t want to leave it in a box collecting dust,” Mrs. Gordone said. “He gave the last nine years of his life to these students and he loved it. I think there is still something to be learned from his last works.”

 

Mrs. Gordone and Schiffauer share the motivation is to shed light on the “beautiful and sometimes overlooked history of America.” Mrs. Gordone quoted a phrase that she said captures the meaning of the display.

 

“What we are trying to do through portraiture is bring these people back into

 

history,” Mrs. Gordone said. “These were the people whose contribution to making America a more free and just society is so enormous that to not remember may be even losing rights they fought for.”…READ MORE

Art Buzz January 30, 2012: Alexander Nemerov: Yale Art History Professor Nemerov might leave for Stanford next year

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

UNIVERSITY NEWS

Yale Art History Professor Nemerov might leave for Stanford next year

Source: Yale Daily News, 1-30-12

In the final lecture of his legendary art history survey, Prof. Alexander Nemerov comments on the man turning away in "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus," pictured above. Might he turn away from Yale and go west?

In the final lecture of his legendary art history survey, Prof. Alexander Nemerov comments on the man turning away in “Landscape with the Fall of Icarus,” pictured above. Might he turn away from Yale and go west? Photo by Wikimedia Commons.

Alexander Nemerov GRD ’92, an esteemed art historian and chair of Yale’s History of Art Department, may leave for Stanford after this school year, he said in a Monday interview.

Nemerov, whose “Introduction to the History of Art: Renaissance to the Present” was the most popular class on campus this semester, has not yet accepted or rejected a recent offer from Stanford. The professor declined to comment about when he needs to act on the offer, which he said he received during or after Shopping Period.

The chair of Stanford’s Art History department could not be reached for comment on Monday.

Art Buzz January 30, 2012: The Smithsonian: Art History Related Black History Month Events

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

MUSEUM NEWS

Source: WUSA9, 1-30-12

The Smithsonian museums have a slew of film, lectures and performances in celebration of Black History Month. Most of these events and activities are free.

Here are the list of events courtesy of the Smithsonian:

Feature Event

The Institution will kick off Black History Month at the National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum Saturday, Feb. 4, from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., with its “Black History Month Family Day” celebration. The day includes performances by guitarist Warner Williams and step team Taratibu; Can You Spell Harlem?, a puppet show by Schroeder Cherry; hands-on arts and crafts activities; a video project with the Hirshhorn’s Artlab+ teen videographers; and many interactive activities to celebrate family and heritage….READ MORE

Art Buzz January 27, 2012: The Architectural History of Bankers Hill From Victorian manors to modernist homes

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ARCHITECTURE NEWS

The Architectural History of Bankers Hill

From Victorian manors to modernist homes

Source: San Diego News, 1-27-12

In its heyday, Bankers Hill was the center of luxury and wealth in San Diego. The end of the Victorian era brought huge growth to the city as a whole, but especially propelled the few blocks west of Balboa Park into popularity among the financial elite.

The name “Bankers Hill” comes from the great number of financiers and banking tycoons who made their homes in the area. Perhaps the most culturally important mark Bankers Hill made on San Diego’s history was its abundance of architectural gems, some of which still stand today.

From Victorian manors to modernist homes, the neighborhood is a visual, living history of major movements in architecture, with enormous contributions from often overlooked founding fathers of modern San Diego. Bankers Hill undeniably has its roots in the Victorian era, when it began to rise in prominence. Architect and Southern California congressman William Bowers designed the Florence Hotel at Fourth Avenue and Fir Street, in 1884….READ MORE

Art Buzz January 26, 2012: Fu Baoshi: History Unfolding on a Hand Scroll “Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904-1965)” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

Art Review

History Unfolding on a Hand Scroll

Source: NYT, 1-26-12

“Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904-1965)” is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through April 15.

//

The painter Fu Baoshi was born in China in 1904, seven years before the Chinese Revolution brought 2,100 years of dynastic rule to an end. He died in 1965, months before China’s Communist regime unleashed the Cultural Revolution, which aggressively persecuted the country’s writers, artists and other intelligentsia, sometimes unto death….

His trajectory is the subject of an intriguing up-and-down survey at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It suggests that Fu, who came from very humble circumstances and was largely self-taught, was sustained by exceptional talent and a steely yet flexible dedication to his art. His skill and refinement, as well as his willingness to adapt, pervade this show, which is serene on the surface but less so beneath.

“Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904-1965)” contains nearly 90 paintings. Early examples depict Tang-style court ladies, scholars perusing paintings and a calligrapher monk imbibing wine before setting to work. In later works, a line of destroyers plows through waves, and steam shovels strip mine for coal. The most imposing works throughout are panoramic views of majestic mountains, rivers and forests, in which a range of robust textures and scratchy, dry-brush markings impart a vigorous, sometimes wild sense of modernity.

Organized by the Nanjing Museum in China and the Cleveland Museum of Art, this exhibition is a landmark: the first full-dress retrospective of a 20th-century Chinese artist to be seen at the Met. It occupies ground prepared by the excellent exhibitions of classic Chinese painting that Maxwell K. Hearn, a longtime curator at the Met and now head of its department of Asian art, has been staging there for more than three decades….READ MORE

“Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904-1965)” is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through April 15; (212) 535-7710, metmuseum.org

Art Buzz January 26, 2012: University of Southern Indiana: Artists picture American history through personal prisms in USI exhibition

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS

Artists picture American history through personal prisms in USI exhibition

Artists see figures through personal prisms

Source: Evansville Courier & Press, 1-26-12

Muscle-bound cartoon superhero versions of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson battle in Spandex for the presidency in 1796.

Twenty-first century children re-enact Davy Crockett’s 1836 demise at the Alamo.

And Joseph Smith raises his arms in an angelic, martyr’s gesture of grace as an 1832 mob applies tar and feathers to the founding Latter-day Saint in a new art exhibition at the University of Southern Indiana.

Photos Courtesy of artists<br /><br /> Thirty-five artists contributed to the exhibit exploring the stories, myth and history of the United States. "The U.S. History Volumes I and II" is on display at The McCutchan Art Center/ Pace Galleries in the University of Southern Indiana's Liberal Arts building, with artwork including "Polly's Demise," a print by Andrew Kosten (from top to bottom); "Words in Hand," a print by M. Hopson Walker;" and "Revere George," a print by Peter Massing.Photos Courtesy of artists Thirty-five artists contributed to the exhibit exploring the stories, myth and history of the United States. “The U.S. History Volumes I and II” is on display at The McCutchan Art Center/ Pace Galleries in the University of Southern Indiana’s Liberal Arts building, with artwork including “Polly’s Demise,” a print by Andrew Kosten (from top to bottom); “Words in Hand,” a print by M. Hopson Walker;” and “Revere George,” a print by Peter Massing.
Courtesy of Peter Massing<br /><br /> "Revere George," a print by Peter MassingCourtesy of Peter Massing “Revere George,” a print by Peter Massing
Photos Courtesy of artists<br /><br /> "Polly's Demise," a print by Andrew Kosten, is on display in the exhibit, "The U.S. History Volumes I and II," at The McCutchan Art Center/ Pace Galleries in the University of Southern Indiana's Liberal Arts building.

Photos Courtesy of artists “Polly’s Demise,” a print by Andrew Kosten, is on display in the exhibit, “The U.S. History Volumes I and II,” at The McCutchan Art Center/ Pace Galleries in the University of Southern Indiana’s Liberal Arts building.

History, imagination and ambiguity illuminate, shade and detail the 70 prints featured in “U.S. History Volumes I and II,” a show running through March 29 in USI’s McCutchan Art Center/Pace Galleries.

This curious collection of prints by 35 artists from across the country illustrates, questions and raises questions about the first 70 years of the nation’s life. The show features the first two installments in what eventually will be a seven-volume collection organizers aim to send to the Smithsonian Institutions in Washington, D.C., says Andrew Kosten.

Kosten, an assistant professor of art at USI, created two of the prints for the show’s organizer, Brandon Gardner, a USI graduate who teaches at the University of Alabama at Huntsville….READ MORE

IF YOU GO

—- What: “The U.S. History Volumes I and II,” featuring 35 artists’ prints reflecting the first 70 years of the nation’s events, stories and mysteries.

—- Where: The McCutchan Art Center/ Pace Galleries in the University of Southern Indiana’s Liberal Arts building

—- When: The exhibition will run through March 19. with a free, public artists reception from 2 to 4 p.m. on Feb. 5. The gallery normally is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays.

—- Admission: Free and open to the public

Art Buzz January 23, 2012: Frank Gehry: Design for President Eisenhower’s national memorial misses the mark

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ARCHITECTURE NEWS

Gehry’s design for Eisenhower memorial misses the mark

Source: Washington Post, 1-23-12

Anonymous/AP – This artist rendering provided by the Eisenhower Commission on Oct. 6, 2011, shows an updated model which shows the Maryland Avenue vista and promenade for the national memorial in Washington for President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Eisenhower’s family wants a memorial in the nation’s capital redesigned, saying the current plans overemphasize his humble Kansas roots and neglect…Architect Frank Gehry’s design for the congressionally authorized memorial to President Dwight D. Eisenhower is creatively unconventional, innovative in form and use of materials, monumental in scale — and the wrong thing to build.

Gehry’s initial concept, first unveiled early last year by the Eisenhower Memorial Commission, has elicited much criticism, including from Eisenhower family members. Critics have faulted the design’s non-traditional style and unusual interpretive strategy, as well as the process that led to the design.

 

Whatever your view, any design critique must address two basic questions: Will the form and content of the memorial meaningfully and movingly commemorate Eisenhower? And, as an artistic work of urban design and landscape architecture, will the memorial enhance the form and fabric of America’s capital city? Regrettably, the current design has serious problems on both counts…READ MORE

Art Buzz January 23, 2012: Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life reopens

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life reopens

Source: San Franciasco Chronicle, 1-23-12

Sarah Rice / Special to The Chronicle

Helen Bobell, of Oakland, shows her son Kai, 22 months, a 20th century Torah Ark pediment at the re-opening of Magnes Museum in Berkeley, Calif., Sunday, January 22, 2012.

The institution long known as Judah L. Magnes Museum – custodian of pre-eminent collections representing the cultural history of Jews in the West – reopened Sunday as the Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life at UC Berkeley’s Bancroft Library. The name change tells the story in shorthand.

The Magnes’ utilitarian but sparkling new quarters, a 25,000-square-foot building on Allston Way, just steps from BART’s Downtown Berkeley Station, houses its holdings of paintings, sculpture, textiles, graphic arts and ritual objects. Rare books, musical manuscripts and certain ephemera in its collection will reside elsewhere in UC Berkeley’s library system.

Under an agreement completed in 2010, the collections of the Magnes now belong to the university, which will preserve them for the wider community and as resources for scholars and courses in Jewish history and religious studies.

The Magnes board purchased the Allston Way building – a disused printing plant – in 1997, wisely anticipating the institution’s eventual relocation and expansion, if not on the present terms.

The merger agreement with UC Berkeley followed lengthy efforts that ultimately failed to marry the Magnes with the San Francisco institution now known as the Contemporary Jewish Museum….READ MORE

Art Buzz January 22, 2012: Exhibition Review A Jewish Museum Shifts Identity Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

Exhibition Review A Jewish Museum Shifts Identity

Source: NYT, 1-22-12

Keegan Houser

Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life A Bay Area museum is part of the University of California, Berkeley. Above left, Italian Book of Esther scroll; right, German Torah binder, both 18th century. More Photos »


The story of how the Judah L. Magnes Museum — whose collection of Judaica is the third largest in the country — became the Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life at the Bancroft Library of the University of California, Berkeley, might not seem terribly ripe with complication or implication. In recent years small private museums facing financial strain have often sought refuge by negotiating new lives within universities. Perhaps on Sunday, when the Magnes opened its doors to the public in a building it had long owned near the campus here, it was simply inaugurating another phase of its 50-year life.

Multimedia

But along the way the Magnes has had more than its share of high drama, including a much anticipated union with another local Jewish museum in 2002, closely followed by a quickie divorce on grounds of irreconcilable differences. Then, the Magnes had to watch as its onetime partner achieved local glory as the Contemporary Jewish Museum, opening in downtown San Francisco in 2008 in a new building designed by Daniel Libeskind. Meanwhile the Magnes struggled to map out a future for its rambling and exotic collection of some 15,000 objects and manuscripts, which since 1966 had been housed in a rambling and exotic mansion on a residential street. It attracted no more than 10,000 visitors annually and cost $2 million a year to maintain.

The story also has larger resonance. The fate of the Magnes has much to do with the evolution of the American identity museum, with its chronicles of ethnic liberation amid hardship. And it is also intimately connected to the political and cultural temperament of the Bay Area.

But to understand those issues it is best, first, to consider the collection itself. The Magnes was created in 1962 by Seymour Fromer, a Jewish educator, and Rebecca Camhi Fromer, his wife. Its artifacts were deliberately wide-ranging, including not just Jewish ritual objects but manuscripts, music and ephemera. As the collections grew they shed light on Jewish life in the pioneering era of the American West, on Jewish observance in communities in India or Tunisia, and on artworks that testified in some way to Jewish experience in the 20th century. Over the decades scholarly catalogs were published and exhibitions were mounted in the museum’s Berkeley mansion, examining, say, the culture of Kurdish Jews or the nature of Jewish cemeteries during the Gold Rush….READ MORE

The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life is at 2121 Allston Way, near Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley, Calif.; magnes.org.

A version of this review appeared in print on January 23, 2012, on page C1 of the New York edition with the headline: A Jewish Museum Shifts Identity.

Art Buzz January 22, 2012: Adele Nelson: Visiting professor speaks on Brazilian art at Southern Methodist University

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ACADEMIC & UNIVERSITY NEWS

Visiting professor speaks on Brazilian art at Southern Methodist University

Source: SMU Daily, 1-22-12

On Jan. 19, visiting assistant professor Adele Nelson set an admirable bar for SMU’s first Comini Lecture of the semester.

Nelson’s lecture, “Creating History: The Definition of Modernism at the Second São Paulo Bienal,” featured Brazil’s renowned exhibit, the Bienal from 1953-54, and the recognition it summoned.

“[The Bienal de São Paulo was] a conduit to the international art scene,” Nelson said. “[It] gained international visibility with being the second international exhibit in the Americas.”

The Meadows School of the Arts art history department considered Nelson a fit candidate for their faculty as well as the Comini Lecture Series.

“We are very lucky to have her,” said art history professor and colleague Roberto Tejada. “She brings an intense and deep knowledge of 20th-century Latin American art.”

Nelson’s interesting and stimulating lecture on Thursday showcased her expertise on Brazil’s political position and how it coincided with its modern art exploration.

She emphasized that Brazil found this artistic exploration because Europe was decimated after WWII while Brazil was economically flourishing.

“Brazilian artists have a different history of European modern art,” Nelson said.

Distinguished endowed chair of SMU’s art history department, Roberto Tejada, agrees with Nelson’s argument. “We’re able to talk about European art but from the historical perspective of Latin America,” Tejada said.

As 20th-century Latin American art being one of Tejada’s specialties, he and the department are constantly questioning the term “Latin America.”

However, the SMU faculty definitively has a growing interest in this field.

Professor Nelson is starting her second semester of teaching at SMU.

She has replaced art history professor Amy Buono while professor Buono is on research leave.

Nelson’s specialization in Brazilian studies and Portuguese is not far off from Professor Buono’s studies in Colonial Latin America and the Portuguese Atlantic.

Conversely, Nelson is a modernist and is able to offer SMU students expertise of a different time period.

Interim chair and associate professor Dr. Pamela Patton said, “She augments Dr. Buono’s regular courses.”

Patton believes that Nelson’s three-year curatorial experience at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and her modernist perspective is beneficial for students.

“[Nelson’s knowledge allows Buono’s] students to learn a little more about the same subject,” Patton said.

Also being the subject of her dissertation, Nelson’s lecture on the Bienal de São Paulo sparked passionate interest among the art history faculty on Thursday. Nelson’s thorough analysis on the Bienal de São Paulo’s exhibition in correlation with the architecture designed by Oscar Niemeyer, raised a number of questions from faculty and students.

Professor Patton specifically noted that Nelson’s curatorial experience aids her understanding of how material and texture gave the Bienal de São Paulo’s artwork a presence in the room.

Professor Randall Griffin discussed Brazils’ “utopian project with the Bienal,” adding to Nelson’s lecture.

With the art history department’s newly created Ph.D program, Rhetorics of Art, Space and Culture, Nelson’s historical and political resume has proved to be perfectly synced with their curriculum.

Art Buzz January 21, 2012: The history of Kansas railways is shown in an art exhibit on display at the Great Overland Station of Topeka in the Fink Exhibit Gallery

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

Art exhibits railway history

Source: Washburn Review, 1-21-12

train, overland stationLinnzi Fusco, Washburn Review

Art History: The history of Kansas railways is shown in an art exhibit on display now through Jan. 28 at the Great Overland Station in NOTO.

Related Articles

VIDEO: Railroad Festival Brings Entertainment to Topeka

The Great Overland Station of Topeka is showing off a grand collection of Kansas’ railroad history. The Station will be showing the exhibit “The People’s Kind of Railroad: The Santa Fe, the City, the State, and the Nation,” in the Fink Exhibit Gallery through Jan. 28.

The Great Overland Station, located in the North Topeka Arts District, is a preserved historical landmark of Kansas history, as well as a museum and education center. It hosts many exhibits, programs and activities such as senior proms for local high schools. The station first opened in January of 1927 and reopened in 2004 as The Great Overland Station Museum, with over 125 trains still passing through every day.

On the upper level of the station is where you will find the Fink Exhibit Gallery. This exhibit shows the history of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, which is now the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway, throughout its 152-year history.

The exhibit, which takes up the entirety of the space allotted, is a room full of rich Kansas history. The exhibit was made possible by a grant provided by the Kansas Humanities Council.

“This is an exhibit I’ve wanted to do since before the station even opened,” said Beth Fager, campaign director and exhibit coordinator for the Great Overland Station. “It’s important to the livelihood of Topeka.”…READ MORE

Art Buzz January 20, 2012: ‘L.A. Raw’ offers a dark slice of art history at the Pasadena Museum of California Art

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

‘L.A. Raw’ offers a dark slice of art history in Pasadena

Source: Pasadena Star-News, 1-20-12

“My Lai,” assemblage painting with skulls, by Hans Burkhardt, Courtesy of Jack Rutberg Fine Arts. (Courtesy of Jack Rutberg Fine Arts)

The heyday of the Los Angeles art scene is often thought to be centered around the Ferus Gallery and its contingent of pop and abstract artists in the 1960s.

There was a dark side; the art often was obsessed with political and social issues.

Curator Michael Duncan assembled works that illustrate the light and the dark in “L.A. Raw: Abject Expressionism in Los Angeles 1945-1980, From Rico Lebrun to Paul McCarthy” at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. The exhibit opens Sunday and is part of the Getty Foundation’s ongoing initiative “Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980.”

Duncan is the corresponding editor for “Art in America” and an art writer. He previously curated “Post Surrealism” at PMCA.

“Deposition (Descent from the Cross,” fiberglass sculpture, by Jack Zajac. (Pasadena Museum of California Art)

“What I’m excited about is this show is tracking a different history for the art depicting human needs of today,” Duncan said. “I think that art history has all sorts of different pathways and this is a fresh one that really hasn’t been explored.”

“L.A. Raw” begins with a look at the post-World War II artists around Rick Lebrun. Lebrun taught at the Jepson Art Institute in Los Angeles, emphasizing figure drawing. His own work had ties to European traditions and influences from the Spanish romantic painter Goya, as well as Mexican muralists.

“He wanted to extend the techniques of the Renaissance and also of cubism and make it more like a sculptural rendition,” Duncan said. “That’s where the expressionism comes in: wanting to turn a two-dimensional drawing into a three-dimensional idea of the human body.”

The show tracks Lebrun and his followers and how their work leads to the political art of the ’60s, branching out through artists of different ethnicities and on to the emergence of feminist and performance art.

The selection process for “L.A. Raw” was tough. For example, Masonite painter Jan Stussy taught at UCLA for 35 years and was a respected artist in the 1960s. His entire life’s work is about 2,000 pieces; Duncan chose four for the exhibit.

“The art world is very fickle and unless you have powerful galleries behind you, you just get sent to storage units in Burbank,” Duncan said.

“The basic message of the show is very simple: Expressionism is a kind of art form that never goes away,” he said. “Abstraction and other art movements may come in and out of vogue, but the expression of the human condition is a through-line that you can find since the Renaissance. And it’s here in L.A.”


L.A. RAW

Abject Expressionism in Los Angeles 1945-1980, From Rico Lebrun to Paul McCarthy

Opens Sunday . Noon-5 p.m. Wednesdays-Sundays through May 20

Pasadena Museum of California Art, 490 E. Union St., Pasadena

$7

626-568-3665

www.pmcaonline.org

Opening reception

7-10 p.m. Sunday $5 admission.


“L.A. Raw” features more than 120 works by more than 40 artists. The media ranges from paintings and sculpture to videos and photography. Highlights include Hans Burkhardt’s 12-foot wide painting, “My Lai,” which bears a scattering of real human skulls affixed to the canvas to sharpen the artist’s anti-Vietnam War message.

“Some critics have referred to it as the most powerful anti-war statement ever made by an artist,” Duncan said.

The Ceeje Gallery is represented by Armenian artist Charles Garabedian and Chicano artists Roberto Chavez and Eduardo Carillo, who incorporated humor and references to art history into their work. There are also early paintings and videos of performance artist Paul McCarthy, along with footage of Chris Burden and Nancy Buchanan.

L.A. Raw “is a dark vision of mankind, but it’s a very powerful and meaningful work,” Duncan said. “It’s not a frivolous day at the beach.”

michelle.mills@sgvn.com

twitter.com/Mickieszoo

626-962-8811 Ext. 2128

Art Buzz January 19, 2012: Art History On Display At Columbus Museum of Art Caravaggio & Monet to Matisse exhibits

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

Art History On Display At Columbus Museum Of Art

Source: ONN TV, 1-19-12

discover ohioBright colors, broad brush strokes and the height of Impressionism art graces the wall on one side of the Columbus Museum of Art.

Dark colors, human expressions and realistic settings grace the other walls.

“I think both exhibitions have been extremely popular, because they speak to different human needs and responses,” said Dominique Vasseur, Columbus Museum of Art curator.

Right now, art lovers can experience the best of both worlds at the museum, ONN’s Lisa Smith reported.

The Caravaggio exhibit is in recognition of the city’s bicentennial.

The famous painting, “behold the man” is on loan from Columbus’ sister-city in Genoa, Italy. It depicts Jesus and Pontius Pilot.

“He’s presenting Christ to the people, immediately before Christ’s crucifixion,” Vasseur said.

The face of Pontius Pilot is artist Michaelangelo Caravaggio.

“He was an extremely clever artist,” Vasseur said. “He was a very, very bright man. I think he took a great deal of pleasure in putting himself into his paintings. He was going to show the art establishment that Michaelangelo (Buonarroti) was not the only Michaelangelo in town and that he was going to equal him.”

The two exhibits cover several centuries of artistic masterpieces. You can look at art from the 17th century all the way up to the 20th century.

“Monet to Matisse” includes remarkable paintings by Claude Monet, Henri Matisse and others. It is all part of a 78 piece private collection.

“Most people love Monet and French Impressionists,” Vasseur said. “They love the color and they love the mood. I think there’s a timelessness about Impressionism that’s never going to become stale.”

This is the 20th anniversary of the Sirak Collection at the Columbus Museum of Art which features Monet and other works.

That exhibit runs through May 13, but the Caravaggio exhibit ends February 12.

Art Buzz January 16, 2012: Art History Meets Science: Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe at Northwestern University’s Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART NEWS

Art History Meets Science: Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe

Source: Gapers Block, 1-16-12

cat55b_Beham-ManWomanHead_HAM_G8908.jpgScientists and history buffs may not realize it, but artists of the Northern Renaissance made vital contributions to the development of science during the 16th century.

Through a collection of rare and treasured prints, drawings, books, maps and scientific instruments, Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe at Northwestern University’s Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art will demonstrate the active role artists played in facilitating the understanding of new concepts in astronomy, geography, natural history, and anatomy.

Featuring work by Albrecht Dürer, Hans Holbein, Hendrick Goltzius, Jacques de Gheyn and others, the exhibition will run Jan. 17-April 8, and will include in-gallery digital displays, video and audio segments, an iPhone/iPad app, and interactive replicas of sundials, globes, and other tools, along with a series of gallery lectures by art historians and curators over the coming weeks.

Admission to the Block Museum galleries and programs is free. For more information, visit the museum’s website or call 847-491-4000.

 

Art Buzz January 16, 2012: George Wingard: Discovery of jar brings new insight into history of artisans who created pottery near Augusta

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART NEWS

Discovery of jar brings new insight into history of artisans who created pottery near Augusta

Source: The Augusta Chronicle, 1-16-12

PHOTO: This undated photo provided by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program shows a reassembled jar that was found in pieces at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina near Augusta, Ga. The jar was made by the slave potter known only as Dave, and dated April 16, 1862. After its discovery, it helped inspire a new documentary film that will be released later this year. (AP Photo/Savannah River Archaeological Research Program, George Wingard via The Augusta Chronicle)
Click to view (2 Photos)

Savannah River Site historian George Wingard’s fascination with the slave potter known as “Dave” began with a phone call in 2006 and led to an upcoming film honoring one of the South’s most mysterious artisans.

“That morning, we had people looking around in an area where some monitoring wells were planned,” said Wingard, the administrative manager for the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program, whose workers are required to evaluate areas to be disturbed by construction.

As routine, random test holes were dug to determine whether any important artifacts might lie beneath the soil, the technician discovered the proverbial needle in a haystack: a large, greenish-glazed shard of stoneware pottery.

“When he pulled it out, it had ‘Dave’ inscribed on it,” Wingard said. “He called me right away, from his cellphone.”

Both men knew immediately the find was an important one.

Dave was a slave who worked among the dozens of potteries that operated during the 1800s throughout South Carolina’s plantation-strewn “Edgefield District” near Augusta.

The region’s alkaline-glazed pottery is widely sought by art collectors, but the works of the mysterious Dave are the most prized examples of all. Further excavation at the remote hillside within Savannah River Site yielded more pieces of Dave’s handiwork.

“We were digging in what turned out to be a mid-20th century trash pile,” Wingard said. “We found about 95 percent of the jar.”

In addition to Dave’s signature, the jar – which was carefully reassembled – carried the date of manufacture: April 16, 1862. Soon it became a popular item in the research program’s outreach activities, which include educational programs to acquaint others with the region’s cultural past….READ MORE