Art Buzz January 26, 2012: Fu Baoshi: History Unfolding on a Hand Scroll “Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904-1965)” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Art Review

History Unfolding on a Hand Scroll

Source: NYT, 1-26-12

“Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904-1965)” is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through April 15.

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The painter Fu Baoshi was born in China in 1904, seven years before the Chinese Revolution brought 2,100 years of dynastic rule to an end. He died in 1965, months before China’s Communist regime unleashed the Cultural Revolution, which aggressively persecuted the country’s writers, artists and other intelligentsia, sometimes unto death….

His trajectory is the subject of an intriguing up-and-down survey at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It suggests that Fu, who came from very humble circumstances and was largely self-taught, was sustained by exceptional talent and a steely yet flexible dedication to his art. His skill and refinement, as well as his willingness to adapt, pervade this show, which is serene on the surface but less so beneath.

“Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904-1965)” contains nearly 90 paintings. Early examples depict Tang-style court ladies, scholars perusing paintings and a calligrapher monk imbibing wine before setting to work. In later works, a line of destroyers plows through waves, and steam shovels strip mine for coal. The most imposing works throughout are panoramic views of majestic mountains, rivers and forests, in which a range of robust textures and scratchy, dry-brush markings impart a vigorous, sometimes wild sense of modernity.

Organized by the Nanjing Museum in China and the Cleveland Museum of Art, this exhibition is a landmark: the first full-dress retrospective of a 20th-century Chinese artist to be seen at the Met. It occupies ground prepared by the excellent exhibitions of classic Chinese painting that Maxwell K. Hearn, a longtime curator at the Met and now head of its department of Asian art, has been staging there for more than three decades….READ MORE

“Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904-1965)” is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through April 15; (212) 535-7710, metmuseum.org

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Art Buzz January 26, 2012: University of Southern Indiana: Artists picture American history through personal prisms in USI exhibition

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS

Artists picture American history through personal prisms in USI exhibition

Artists see figures through personal prisms

Source: Evansville Courier & Press, 1-26-12

Muscle-bound cartoon superhero versions of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson battle in Spandex for the presidency in 1796.

Twenty-first century children re-enact Davy Crockett’s 1836 demise at the Alamo.

And Joseph Smith raises his arms in an angelic, martyr’s gesture of grace as an 1832 mob applies tar and feathers to the founding Latter-day Saint in a new art exhibition at the University of Southern Indiana.

Photos Courtesy of artists<br /><br /> Thirty-five artists contributed to the exhibit exploring the stories, myth and history of the United States. "The U.S. History Volumes I and II" is on display at The McCutchan Art Center/ Pace Galleries in the University of Southern Indiana's Liberal Arts building, with artwork including "Polly's Demise," a print by Andrew Kosten (from top to bottom); "Words in Hand," a print by M. Hopson Walker;" and "Revere George," a print by Peter Massing.Photos Courtesy of artists Thirty-five artists contributed to the exhibit exploring the stories, myth and history of the United States. “The U.S. History Volumes I and II” is on display at The McCutchan Art Center/ Pace Galleries in the University of Southern Indiana’s Liberal Arts building, with artwork including “Polly’s Demise,” a print by Andrew Kosten (from top to bottom); “Words in Hand,” a print by M. Hopson Walker;” and “Revere George,” a print by Peter Massing.
Courtesy of Peter Massing<br /><br /> "Revere George," a print by Peter MassingCourtesy of Peter Massing “Revere George,” a print by Peter Massing
Photos Courtesy of artists<br /><br /> "Polly's Demise," a print by Andrew Kosten, is on display in the exhibit, "The U.S. History Volumes I and II," at The McCutchan Art Center/ Pace Galleries in the University of Southern Indiana's Liberal Arts building.

Photos Courtesy of artists “Polly’s Demise,” a print by Andrew Kosten, is on display in the exhibit, “The U.S. History Volumes I and II,” at The McCutchan Art Center/ Pace Galleries in the University of Southern Indiana’s Liberal Arts building.

History, imagination and ambiguity illuminate, shade and detail the 70 prints featured in “U.S. History Volumes I and II,” a show running through March 29 in USI’s McCutchan Art Center/Pace Galleries.

This curious collection of prints by 35 artists from across the country illustrates, questions and raises questions about the first 70 years of the nation’s life. The show features the first two installments in what eventually will be a seven-volume collection organizers aim to send to the Smithsonian Institutions in Washington, D.C., says Andrew Kosten.

Kosten, an assistant professor of art at USI, created two of the prints for the show’s organizer, Brandon Gardner, a USI graduate who teaches at the University of Alabama at Huntsville….READ MORE

IF YOU GO

—- What: “The U.S. History Volumes I and II,” featuring 35 artists’ prints reflecting the first 70 years of the nation’s events, stories and mysteries.

—- Where: The McCutchan Art Center/ Pace Galleries in the University of Southern Indiana’s Liberal Arts building

—- When: The exhibition will run through March 19. with a free, public artists reception from 2 to 4 p.m. on Feb. 5. The gallery normally is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays.

—- Admission: Free and open to the public