Art Buzz February 1, 2012: Art historians find copy of Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa — Reveals new details

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART NEWS

Mona Lisa copy reveals new detail

Source: BBC News, 2-1-12

The Mona Lisa and the replica The restored painting (right) offers more detail than the original (left)

A painting thought to be the earliest replica of Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa has been discovered at Madrid’s Prado Museum.

The Prado said it did not realise its significance until a recent restoration revealed hidden layers.

The artwork features the same female figure, but had been covered over with black paint and varnish.

The painting is thought to have been created by one of Leonardo’s students alongside the 16th century original.

There are dozens of surviving Mona Lisa replicas from the 16th and 17th centuries.

Mona Lisa replica
The Prado’s copy of the Mona Lisa had been overpainted black

The Art Newspaper, which reported the discovery, said the “sensational find will transform our understanding of the world’s most famous picture”.

The original painting, which currently hangs at the Louvre in Paris, is obscured by several layers of old, cracked varnish.

However, cleaning and restoration is thought to be too risky because the painting is fragile.

The Art Newspaper said the removal of the black paint on the replica had revealed “the fine details of the delicate Tuscan landscape”, which mirrors the background of Leonardo’s masterpiece.

Martin Bailey, who reported on the discovery for the paper, told the BBC: “You see Lisa’s eyes, which are quite enticing, and her enigmatic smile. It actually makes her look much younger.”…READ MORE

Advertisements

Art Buzz February 1, 2012: Boston College’s McMullen Museum of Art: Days In The Lives McMullen exhibition shows artists’ interest in 19th, 20th century rural Ireland

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS

Days In The Lives

McMullen exhibition shows artists’ interest in 19th, 20th century rural Ireland

Source: Boston College, 2-2-12
file
“Rural Ireland: The Inside Story,” which will run through June 3, is an exclusive exhibition that introduces American viewers to many recently discovered genre paintings of 19th-century rural interiors.
The lives of 19th-century Irish country people — how they worshipped, mourned, conducted business, arranged their homes, and educated and entertained themselves — will be the subject of a new McMullen Museum of Art exhibition opening Feb. 11.

“Rural Ireland: The Inside Story,” which will run through June 3, is an exclusive exhibition that introduces American viewers to many recently discovered genre paintings of 19th-century rural interiors. It also offers new visual evidence about the varied lives of a politically marginalized population.

Inspired by recent scholarship, “Rural Ireland” reveals that artists working in 19th and early 20th-century Ireland frequently turned to the lives of the country’s rural poor for subject matter — thus challenging assumptions that artists working in Ireland painted only the “big houses” and landscapes of an Anglo-Irish elite society.

Although the works on display reveal poverty and deprivation during the Famine era, they convey aesthetic pleasures, spiritual satisfactions, and tenants’ negotiations with a growing consumer economy.

The museum will hold a free opening celebration for the Boston College community and general public on Feb. 13 from 7-9 p.m.

The exhibition comprises outstanding works of art from such lenders as the National Gallery of Ireland, the Crawford Art Gallery, Cork, the National Library of Ireland, the Ulster Museum, the National Gallery of Scotland, as well as from a range of smaller public and private collections in Ireland, the United Kingdom and the United States.

“The McMullen Museum is pleased to present this examination of paintings, many recently discovered, and of newly-collected artifacts from Irish rural life,” said McMullen Museum Director and Professor of Art History Nancy Netzer. “The exhibition tells the ‘inside story’ of Ireland’s country people through its selection of outstanding genre interiors, most never displayed in North America.”…READ MORE

Art Buzz February 1, 2012: ‘Making History: Antiquaries in Britain’ at Yale University’s Center for British Art

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS

‘Making History: Antiquaries in Britain’ At Yale

Magna Carta, Local Domesday Book, Bronze Age Shield Among Items On Display

Source: The Hartford Courant, 2-1-12

"Saint Augustine's Gate, Canterbury"

“Saint Augustine’s Gate, Canterbury” by J.M.W. Turner, 1793, watercolor and graphite on cream wove paper. (Yale Center for British Art / February 1, 2008)

History is changing all the time. A new artifact is discovered that shines a light on a previously murky period of antiquity. Then new details are learned about that era, altering how we perceive that artifact. Real history is revealed, myths fall away. The cycle of discovery and rediscovery is neverending.

These themes come to the fore in the new exhibit at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven. “Making History: Antiquaries in Britain” is a celebration of the Society of Antiquaries of London, the 205-year-old organization dedicated to preserving documents and relics from all eras of British history.

“Things are constantly being rethought by archaeologists,” said John Lewis, co-curator of the exhibit, while pointing to a Bronze Age shield, circa 1300-1100 BC. “Swords, shields and spears can develop myths and lineages of their own.”…READ MORE