Art Musings February 19, 2014: Obama rehabs art history loving image, sends apology letter, hosts Monuments Men

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART MUSINGS

Obama rehabs art history loving image, sends apology letter, hosts Monuments Men

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Since causing an uproar when he mocked the importance and relevance of graduating university with an art history degree, President Barack Obama has been publicly trying to make up for the “glib” remark, showing he truly “loves…

READ MORE

President Barack Obama looks at the Edward Hopper paintings now displayed in the Oval Office, Feb. 7, 2014.

Obama appreciates two new Edward Hopper paintings now adorning the Oval Office

President Barack Obama appreciates two new Edward Hopper painting now adorning the Oval Office, Jan. 7, 2014; Obama is trying to rehab his image relating to the arts after joking about art history degrees in a speech about technical job training, Jan. 30, 2014 (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Advertisements

Art Musings February 16, 2014: Obama’s Art History Remarks puts the humanities vs professional degrees debate back in the spotlight

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART MUSINGS

Obama puts the humanities vs professional degrees debate back in the spotlight

By Bonnie K. Goodman

President Obama needs to look back at President Kennedy’s idealism to recognize the importance of the arts
The debate of the importance of the humanities, liberal arts and social science university degree versus a professional degree, or a degree…READ MORE

Art Buzz September 13, 2013: Harvard Art Museums project nearing end

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

MUSEUM NEWS

Harvard Art Museums project nearing end

Source: Boston Globe, 9-13-13

The last time Harvard University’s Fogg Art Museum was open, George W. Bush occupied the White House and Manny Ramirez played left field for the Red Sox….READ MORE

Art Buzz August 14, 2013: University of California, Riverside to Launch Ph.D. in Art History in Fall 2014

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART EDUCATION NEWS

UCR to Launch Ph.D. in Art History in Fall 2014

Source: UC Riverside, 8-14-13

The University of California, Riverside will offer a Ph.D. in art history beginning in fall 2014, a degree program that will focus on the history of photography, sculpture and architecture….READ MORE

Art Buzz July 22, 2013: Hoover Library and Archives brings out its art to illustrate history

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

Hoover Library and Archives brings out its art to illustrate history

Source: Stanford University News, 7-22-13

Hoover Library and Archives brings out its art to illustrate history. The archives of the Hoover Institution has amassed quite a collection over 90 years….READ MORE

Art Buzz May 7, 2013: A Destiny’s Child-Inspired Study Guide for Art History Majors

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART HISTORY NEWS

A Destiny’s Child-Inspired Study Guide for Art History Majors

Source: BlackBook Magazine, 5-7-13

We here at BlackBook love fine art from many eras, and we also love Beyoncé. And as often happens with these things, some genius on the Internet has decided to marry the two at last….READ MORE

Art Buzz February 29, 2012: Alexander Nemerov: Yale University History of Art Professor confirms move to Stanford University

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART HISTORIAN — UNIVERSITY NEWS

Nemerov confirms move to Stanford

Source: Yale Daily News, 2-29-12

Alexander Nemerov GRD ’92, chair of the History of Art Department and Vincent J. Scully Professor of the History of Art, will leave Yale after this semester to begin teaching at Stanford in the fall.

Nemerov said he decided to accept a position on Stanford’s faculty within the past few days, after initially receiving the job offer in January. His spring survey course, “Introduction to the History of Art: Renaissance to the Present,” was Yale’s most popular class this term, with the highest number of students registered during shopping period.

“I’m very sad that I won’t be teaching here anymore,” Nemerov said in a Tuesday interview. “I have great feelings about Yale and this was a very difficult decision, but I’m happy to begin the next phase of my career at Stanford.”

Nemerov graduated from Yale with a master’s degree and doctorate in the history of art, and taught at Stanford before returning to Yale as an instructor in 2001.

Yale College Dean Mary Miller, who was part of the team that recruited Nemerov to Yale’s faculty from Stanford, said he has made a significant impact on the History of Art Department in his 11 years at Yale.

“His contribution to the department, to Yale College students and to the University is so great that it cannot easily be measured,” Miller said in an email. “We have all — colleagues, students, friends — benefited from his ability to make the paint on the canvas, the hand of the sculptor, the grain of wood come to life with his careful words and laser-like intellect.”

More than 500 students shopped “Introduction to the History of Art” this semester, but Nemerov capped enrollment in the course to about 300 for the first time to match the capacity of the auditorium of the Yale University Art Gallery, where the class is held. Ten students interviewed said they were disappointed to hear of Nemerov’s departure, and five said they had planned to take Nemerov’s course in the future….READ MORE

Art Buzz February 28, 2012: Alexander Nemerov: History of Art Professor will leave Yale University at the end of academic year for Stanford University

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART HISTORIAN — UNIVERSITY NEWS

Nemerov will leave Yale at the end of academic year

Source: Yale Daily News, 2-28-12

Alexander Nemerov GRD ’92 will leave his post as chair of the History of Art Department to take on a new role at Stanford.

Alexander Nemerov GRD ’92 will leave his post as chair of the History of Art Department to take on a new role at Stanford. Photo by Wikimedia Commons.

Alexander Nemerov GRD ’92, chair of the History of Art Department and the professor behind Yale’s most popular course, will leave Yale at this academic year’s end to start teaching at Stanford in the fall.

photo

Yale University

Alexander Nemerov GRD ’92.

“I’m very sad that I won’t be teaching here anymore,” Nemerov said in a Tuesday interview. “I have great feelings about Yale and this was a very difficult decision, but I’m happy to begin the next phase of my career at Stanford.”

In January, Nemerov told the News that he received a job offer from Stanford sometime after the start of the spring semester. At that time, he had not yet decided whether to stay. On Tuesday, he said he made his decision in the past few days….READ MORE

Art Buzz February 21, 2012: Alan Pizer: Time abroad adds spice to art history professor’s lectures

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART HISTORIANS’ NEWS

Time abroad adds spice to art history professor’s lectures

Source: The University Star, 2-21-12

A globetrotting Texas State professor regales students with stories of past less-than-legal antics.

Alan Pizer, art history professor, was an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin when he studied abroad in Israel. While overseas, he traveled the world and took photographs, some of which were illegal.

Alan Pizer, senior art lecturer, reviews a photo from his office Feb. 20 taken inside an Egyptian tomb, where photography is prohibited.

Pizer studied in Israel at the University of Haifa. During his free time, he traveled to different parts of the Middle East taking photographs along the way.

In the 1980s, Pizer traveled to Egypt. He visited Tel el-Amarna, an Egyptian archaeological site that was once a powerful city ruled by Pharaoh Akhenaten.

Pizer said he went to the ancient tombs in Tel el-Amarna after he’d studied them in school.

His girlfriend, who was traveling with him, was sick with a stomach virus the day they planned on visiting the city. Later he discovered there was a travel warning issued to U.S. citizens in regards to an Islamist group known as the Muslim Brotherhood.

Pizer said as soon as he entered the city, an Egyptian police officer started to follow him. Pizer took this as a good sign, believing he would have protection if needed.

At the site, Pizer found a tomb that hadn’t been destroyed. He said an Egyptian police officer tricked him into taking a picture of the tomb, knowing it was against the law.

After taking the picture, the officer threatened to arrest Pizer unless he paid a bribe of $25. In response, Pizer said he would report the officer to the tourist police.

Pizer said the officer agreed to let him go, but the forbidden photograph has never been put on display.

While a student in Israel, Pizer traveled to Syria as well. He said he lied about his religion to acquire a visa.

“Looking back, I must’ve had a death wish,” he said. “In Syria, I pretended to take pictures of my then girlfriend. Instead, I took pictures of the Syrian army.”

Pizer said he met an Israeli journalist when he returned. When she asked him why he went to Syria, he said it was because “you can’t.”

Pizer said his students and colleagues tend to embellish the stories he tells.

Cody Marshall, photography senior, said he took Pizer’s class two years ago. Marshall said he vaguely remembers Pizer telling the class about his time in Tel el-Amarna.

“I really enjoyed having him as a professor,” Marshall said. “He’s like the Indiana Jones of Art History.”

Pizer received a master’s in art history at the University of Texas and is currently working on his dissertation. Alison Ricketson, art history senior, has seen the effects Pizer’s stories have on his students.

Ricketson is currently Pizer’s student assistant. She said his stories make him more personable as a professor.

“He has a lot of amazing photos to teach from that are not in the book,” she said. “What he’s seen has inspired me to travel.”

Pizer said he hasn’t had time to travel alone in recent years. He is currently the study abroad program director for Art and Design students and leads a trip to Florence every summer.

“As a student, I had a certain kind of rush,” he said. “I’ve seen things people will never see and experienced things people will never experience. I miss that freedom.”

Art Buzz January 30, 2012: Alexander Nemerov: Yale Art History Professor Nemerov might leave for Stanford next year

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

UNIVERSITY NEWS

Yale Art History Professor Nemerov might leave for Stanford next year

Source: Yale Daily News, 1-30-12

In the final lecture of his legendary art history survey, Prof. Alexander Nemerov comments on the man turning away in "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus," pictured above. Might he turn away from Yale and go west?

In the final lecture of his legendary art history survey, Prof. Alexander Nemerov comments on the man turning away in “Landscape with the Fall of Icarus,” pictured above. Might he turn away from Yale and go west? Photo by Wikimedia Commons.

Alexander Nemerov GRD ’92, an esteemed art historian and chair of Yale’s History of Art Department, may leave for Stanford after this school year, he said in a Monday interview.

Nemerov, whose “Introduction to the History of Art: Renaissance to the Present” was the most popular class on campus this semester, has not yet accepted or rejected a recent offer from Stanford. The professor declined to comment about when he needs to act on the offer, which he said he received during or after Shopping Period.

The chair of Stanford’s Art History department could not be reached for comment on Monday.

Art Buzz January 22, 2012: Adele Nelson: Visiting professor speaks on Brazilian art at Southern Methodist University

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ACADEMIC & UNIVERSITY NEWS

Visiting professor speaks on Brazilian art at Southern Methodist University

Source: SMU Daily, 1-22-12

On Jan. 19, visiting assistant professor Adele Nelson set an admirable bar for SMU’s first Comini Lecture of the semester.

Nelson’s lecture, “Creating History: The Definition of Modernism at the Second São Paulo Bienal,” featured Brazil’s renowned exhibit, the Bienal from 1953-54, and the recognition it summoned.

“[The Bienal de São Paulo was] a conduit to the international art scene,” Nelson said. “[It] gained international visibility with being the second international exhibit in the Americas.”

The Meadows School of the Arts art history department considered Nelson a fit candidate for their faculty as well as the Comini Lecture Series.

“We are very lucky to have her,” said art history professor and colleague Roberto Tejada. “She brings an intense and deep knowledge of 20th-century Latin American art.”

Nelson’s interesting and stimulating lecture on Thursday showcased her expertise on Brazil’s political position and how it coincided with its modern art exploration.

She emphasized that Brazil found this artistic exploration because Europe was decimated after WWII while Brazil was economically flourishing.

“Brazilian artists have a different history of European modern art,” Nelson said.

Distinguished endowed chair of SMU’s art history department, Roberto Tejada, agrees with Nelson’s argument. “We’re able to talk about European art but from the historical perspective of Latin America,” Tejada said.

As 20th-century Latin American art being one of Tejada’s specialties, he and the department are constantly questioning the term “Latin America.”

However, the SMU faculty definitively has a growing interest in this field.

Professor Nelson is starting her second semester of teaching at SMU.

She has replaced art history professor Amy Buono while professor Buono is on research leave.

Nelson’s specialization in Brazilian studies and Portuguese is not far off from Professor Buono’s studies in Colonial Latin America and the Portuguese Atlantic.

Conversely, Nelson is a modernist and is able to offer SMU students expertise of a different time period.

Interim chair and associate professor Dr. Pamela Patton said, “She augments Dr. Buono’s regular courses.”

Patton believes that Nelson’s three-year curatorial experience at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and her modernist perspective is beneficial for students.

“[Nelson’s knowledge allows Buono’s] students to learn a little more about the same subject,” Patton said.

Also being the subject of her dissertation, Nelson’s lecture on the Bienal de São Paulo sparked passionate interest among the art history faculty on Thursday. Nelson’s thorough analysis on the Bienal de São Paulo’s exhibition in correlation with the architecture designed by Oscar Niemeyer, raised a number of questions from faculty and students.

Professor Patton specifically noted that Nelson’s curatorial experience aids her understanding of how material and texture gave the Bienal de São Paulo’s artwork a presence in the room.

Professor Randall Griffin discussed Brazils’ “utopian project with the Bienal,” adding to Nelson’s lecture.

With the art history department’s newly created Ph.D program, Rhetorics of Art, Space and Culture, Nelson’s historical and political resume has proved to be perfectly synced with their curriculum.

Art Buzz January 8, 2012: How Art History Majors Power the U.S. Economy

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

UNIVERSITY NEWS

How Art History Majors Power the U.S. Economy

Source: Businessweek, 1-8-12

…Punching-Bag Disciplines

Take Frezza’s punching bag, the effete would-be museum curator. It would be only a slight exaggeration to say that no such student exists.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, humanities majors account for about 12 percent of recent graduates, and art history majors are so rare they’re lost in the noise. They account for less than 0.2 percent of working adults with college degrees, a number that is probably about right for recent graduates, too. Yet somehow art history has become the go-to example for people bemoaning the state of higher education.

A longtime acquaintance perfectly captured the dominant Internet memes in an e-mail he sent me after my last column, which was on rising tuitions. “Many people that go to college lack the smarts and/or the tenacity to benefit in any real sense,” he wrote. “Many of these people would be much better off becoming plumbers — including financially. (No shame in that, who’re you gonna call when your pipes freeze in the middle of the night? An M.A. in Italian art?)”

While government subsidies may indeed distort the choice to go to college in the first place, it’s simply not the case that students are blissfully ignoring the job market in choosing majors. Contrary to what critics imagine, most Americans in fact go to college for what they believe to be “skill-based education.”

A quarter of them study business, by far the most popular field, and 16 percent major in one of the so-called Stem (science, technology, engineering and math) fields. Throw in economics, and you have nearly half of all graduates studying the only subjects such contemptuous pundits recognize as respectable.

The rest, however, aren’t sitting around discussing Aristotle and Foucault….READ MORE