Art Buzz September 15, 2013: Marc Chagall: Love, War, and Exile at the Jewish Museum

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

Art Review

Horrors With Lighthearted Bookends

Jewish Museum Focuses on Chagall’s War Years

Source: NYT, 9-12-13

At the risk of sounding like a crank: Love is the problem with “Chagall: Love, War, and Exile” at the Jewish Museum….READ MORE

Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

Chagall’s “Calvary,” a 1912 oil foreshadowing his wartime Crucifixion paintings evoking the horrors of the Holocaust.

Chagall: Love, War, and Exile

September 15, 2013 – February 2, 2014

Marc Chagall, The Juggler, 1943,oil on canvas, 43 ¼ × 31 ⅛ inches. Private collection. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris./Marc Chagall, Self-Portrait with Clock, 1947, oil on canvas, 33 ⅞ × 27 ⅞ inches. Private collection. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris./Marc Chagall, Time is a River without Banks, 1930–1939, oil on canvas, 39 ¼ × 32 inches. Collection of Kathleen Kapnick, New York. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Chagall: Love, War, and Exile, for the first time in the U.S., explores a significant but neglected period in the artist’s career from the rise of fascism in the 1930s through 1948, years spent in Paris and then in exile to New York. Marc Chagall (1887–1985), one of the foremost modernists of the 20th century, created his unique style by drawing on elements from richly colored folk art motifs, the Russian Christian icon tradition, Cubism, and Surrealism….READ MORE

Art Buzz September 13, 2013: Harvard Art Museums project nearing end

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

MUSEUM NEWS

Harvard Art Museums project nearing end

Source: Boston Globe, 9-13-13

The last time Harvard University’s Fogg Art Museum was open, George W. Bush occupied the White House and Manny Ramirez played left field for the Red Sox….READ MORE

Art Buzz February 1, 2013: Metropolitan Museum of Art: ‘Buddhism Along the Silk Road’: ‘5th-8th Century’

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

‘Buddhism Along the Silk Road’: ‘5th-8th Century’

Source: NYT, 2-1-13

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

A bust from “Buddhism Along the Silk Road,” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

“Buddhism Along the Silk Road: 5th-8th Century,” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, tells a story of the transmission and transfer of art….READ MORE

Art Buzz January 23, 2012: Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life reopens

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life reopens

Source: San Franciasco Chronicle, 1-23-12

Sarah Rice / Special to The Chronicle

Helen Bobell, of Oakland, shows her son Kai, 22 months, a 20th century Torah Ark pediment at the re-opening of Magnes Museum in Berkeley, Calif., Sunday, January 22, 2012.

The institution long known as Judah L. Magnes Museum – custodian of pre-eminent collections representing the cultural history of Jews in the West – reopened Sunday as the Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life at UC Berkeley’s Bancroft Library. The name change tells the story in shorthand.

The Magnes’ utilitarian but sparkling new quarters, a 25,000-square-foot building on Allston Way, just steps from BART’s Downtown Berkeley Station, houses its holdings of paintings, sculpture, textiles, graphic arts and ritual objects. Rare books, musical manuscripts and certain ephemera in its collection will reside elsewhere in UC Berkeley’s library system.

Under an agreement completed in 2010, the collections of the Magnes now belong to the university, which will preserve them for the wider community and as resources for scholars and courses in Jewish history and religious studies.

The Magnes board purchased the Allston Way building – a disused printing plant – in 1997, wisely anticipating the institution’s eventual relocation and expansion, if not on the present terms.

The merger agreement with UC Berkeley followed lengthy efforts that ultimately failed to marry the Magnes with the San Francisco institution now known as the Contemporary Jewish Museum….READ MORE

Art Buzz January 14, 2012: New American Wing Galleries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Opening

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

MUSEUM NEWS

Art review: New American Wing Galleries at the Metropolitan

Source: NJ The Record, 1-14-12

REVIEW

Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze's 'Washington Crossing the Delaware,' 1851, oil on canvas, restored and reframed.

Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze’s ‘Washington Crossing the Delaware,’ 1851, oil on canvas, restored and reframed.

NEW AMERICAN WING GALLERIES FOR PAINTINGS, SCULPTURE AND DECORATIVE ARTS

Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave. at 82nd Street; 212-535-7710 or metmuseum.org.

Permanent installation. Schedule: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday and Tuesday through Thursday, to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Recommended admission: $25, seniors $17, students $12.

You’re going to see a lot of George Washington in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s new galleries for painting and sculpture. And that’s as it should be, given that this third and final phase of a $100 million-plus renovation – opening Monday – aims to tell the story not only of American art, but of the country itself.

Trying to capture the sweep of American history through paintings is an ambitious undertaking, but the Met, as always, is up to the task. The museum might have been a little slow to recognize the accomplishments of its native-born painters – it took till 1980 for it to open its first large galleries dedicated to American art. Now the American Wing attracts more than a million visitors a year.

All collections have their gaps, but it’s hard to find a hole in this display, which takes you from Colonial portraits through Hudson River School landscapes through American impressionism and the canvases of individual geniuses such as Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Thomas Eakins and George Bellows….READ MORE