Art Buzz May 23, 2013: Pablo Picasso: Catalogue Raisoné by Christian Zervos: A Tome to Rival the Artist Himself

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART NEWS

A Tome to Rival the Artist Himself

Source: NYT, 5-23-13

“Pablo Picasso,” a catalogue raisoné by Christian Zervos, is to be republished this fall.
Editions Cahiers d’Art

“Pablo Picasso,” a catalogue raisoné by Christian Zervos, is to be republished this fall.

A legendary catalogue raisonné of Picasso’s works is being republished at a stratospheric price….READ MORE

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Art Buzz April 27, 2013: Family, ‘Not Willing to Forget,’ Pursues Art It Lost to Nazis

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART NEWS

Family, ‘Not Willing to Forget,’ Pursues Art It Lost to Nazis

Source: NYT, 4-27-13

Three generations of a Parisian art dealer’s family have worked tirelessly to recover Picassos, Cézannes and hundreds of other works….READ MORE

Art Buzz March 19, 2013: A New Effort in Boston to Catch 1990 Art Heist Thieves

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART NEWS

A New Effort in Boston to Catch 1990 Art Thieves

Source: NYT, 3-19-13

“La Sortie de Pesage,” by Degas, was one of the paintings taken from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, which provided the image of the stolen work.

The bureau said it believed it had figured out who pulled off a famous theft of 13 works of art, valued at up to $500 million, from Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum….READ MORE

Art Buzz October 16, 2012: A Picasso and a Gauguin Are Among 7 Works Stolen From Kunsthal Museum

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

MUSEUM NEWS

A Picasso and a Gauguin Are Among 7 Works Stolen From a Dutch Museum

Source: NYT, 10-16-12

Art thieves made off overnight with seven paintings, including a Picasso, a Matisse, a Gauguin and two Monets, from the Kunsthal museum in Rotterdam….READ MORE

Art Buzz June 21, 2012: Exhibition Review: “Gauguin, Cezanne, Matisse: Visions of Arcadia” at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

EXHIBITION NEWS & REVIEWS

Erotic Nudes, Satyrs Frolic in Philadelphia Exhibit

Source: Bloomberg, 6-21-12

The mythic Greek valley Arcadia, a harmonic realm balancing dignity with desire, is an enduring source for artists and the subject of a pleasurable exhibition, “Gauguin, Cezanne, Matisse: Visions of Arcadia,” at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

At the entrance to the show, which opened yesterday, is a long, narrow, light-green hallway that functions like an intimate, shaded glen.

Enlarge image Paul Gauguin

Paul Gauguin

Paul Gauguin

Philadelphia Museum of Art via Bloomberg

“Where Do We Come From? What Are We Doing? Where Are We Going?” (1897-98) by Paul Gauguin. To create this mural-sized piece of paradise, Gauguin fled his family and France, going all the way to Polynesia.

Enlarge image Henri Rousseau

Henri Rousseau

Henri Rousseau

Philadelphia Museum of Art via Bloomberg

“The Dream” (1910) by Henri Rousseau. The large dreamscape, a peaceable kingdom in which lions share space with a reclining nude, is among a room full of masterworks in “Visions of Arcadia.”

Enlarge image Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Philadelphia Museum of Art via Bloomberg

“The Large Bathers” (1900-06) by Paul Cezanne. The monumental masterpiece, in the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s permanent collection, is among approximately 60 works by 25 artists in a show that explores the dream of Arcadia, a mythic Greek valley of beauty and repose, dignity and desire.

Enlarge image Henri Matisse

Henri Matisse

Henri Matisse

Philadelphia Museum of Art via Bloomberg

“Bathers by a River” (1910-17) by Henri Matisse. Matisse’s large oil painting is part of a once-in-a-lifetime grouping of masterpieces by Poussin, Gauguin, Cezanne, Rousseau, Derain and Picasso. Source: Philadelphia Museum of Art via Bloomberg

Enlarge image Robert Delaunay

Robert Delaunay

Robert Delaunay

Philadelphia Museum of Art via Bloomberg

“The City of Paris” (1910-12) by Robert Delaunay. In this mural-sized painting, Delaunay, inventing Modernist abstraction, looked to the past, fusing his contemporary view of Paris with his vision of Arcadia.

An erotic reverie of poetry and flesh, the passageway is rich with illustrated verse by Stephane Mallarme and Virgil as well as a bounty of small works — frolicking nudes, gods, goddesses, bathers, nymphs and satyrs.

Here, lovers entwine and tussle, fauns eat grapes and prance, and a Matisse woman’s dangling hair spreads like tentacles. Narcissus listens to the laments of Echo in a 19th- century bronze copy of an ancient Roman original….READ MORE

Art Buzz June 19, 2012: Man Caught On Tape Vandalizing A Picasso At Houston Art Museum

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART NEWS

Man Caught On Tape Vandalizing A Picasso At Houston Art Museum

Source: Business Insider, 6-19-12

In a brazen display of vandalism and apparent misguided expression, a Houston man was caught on cellphone and surveillance camera spray painting Picasso’s 1929 “Woman in a Red Armchair,” according to The Houston Chronicle.

The currently unknown vandal painted an image of a bullfighter killing a bull and sprayed the word “Conquista” on the painting, which is housed at The Menil Collection in Houston, an eyewitness told KPRC-TV in Houston.

An anonymous witness to the attack told KPRC that he began recording his video when he saw the man creep dangerously close to the painting’s canvas. After the defacement, the onlooker sprinted after the graffiti artist who told him that he had “retouched” the rare painting as a way to make a name for himself and honor Picasso’s work.

Let us be unequivocal in declaring — because apparently in Houston there is some confusion on the matter — that tastelessly tagging a masterpiece with ill-conceived scribbles is NOT an acceptable mode of self-expression, nor will it ever be construed as an homage. A matador slaying a bull is on nearly every t-shirt sold in Spain. It’s far from being a wondrously original graphical depiction….READ MORE

Art Buzz February 28, 2012: Jiri Kuchar: 16 paintings by Nazi era artist purchased by Adolf Hitler found in Czech Republic by Art historian

ART & ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY NEWS

ART NEWS

16 paintings by Nazi era artist purchased by Adolf Hitler found in Czech Republic

Paintings Hitler bought found in Czech Republic

Source: AP, 2-28-12

The art works, which Hitler bought in Germany during World War II, had been moved to Czechoslovakia after it was occupied by the Nazis to prevent them being damaged by Allied attacks.

On Monday, author Jiri Kuchar put seven of the paintings on display for reporters at the convent in Doksany in northern Czech Republic where he had identified them. Today, he said, they are probably worth about 50 million koruna ($2.7 million).

“Nobody believed me it could be true,” Kuchar said of his findings. The author, who calls himself “an amateur and enthusiast,” has written about his findings.

Kuchar said Hitler bought the 16 paintings _ by German artists such as Franz Eichhorst, Paul Herrmann, Sepp Hilz, Friedrich W. Kalb, Oscar Oestreicher, Edmund Steppes and Armin Reumann _ in 1942 and 1943 at the Great German art exhibitions that were held annually in Munich from 1937 to 1944.

The German institute whose database includes the works and their buyers _ Zentralinstitut fur Kunstgeschichte in Munich _ confirmed Hitler’s ownership to The Associated Press. Its art experts said Tuesday that while “interesting,” the collection is of “low” value.

As a former artist, Hitler was an art lover and collector. Countless paintings, many done by major European painters, were seized by the Nazis during the Second World War.

At one point, Hitler’s private collection, known as the “Linz Collection,” included almost 5,000 works, and the Nazis had once planned to create a museum for them in Linz, Austria.

In addition to the seven works identified at the convent, Kuchar found seven more that Hitler had once owned at the northern Czech chateau of Zakupy, and one each at the Military History Institute in Prague and the Faculty of Law of Charles University in Prague.

Some contain obvious signs of Nazi propaganda, the author said.

During the occupation, it is believed that the 16 works were part of Hitler’s collection of more than 70 pieces of contemporary German art that the Third Reich stored at a monastery in the southern Czech town of Vyssi Brod, together with larger collections of valuable paintings stolen from Jewish families in Europe….READ MORE